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Dominica Coast

Dominica

Introduction to Dominica

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Known as “The Nature Isle of the Caribbean”, Dominica is one of the most beautiful islands on the planet. A tropical paradise, with rugged, volcanic mountains, Dominica’s landscape boasts everything from waterfalls to mud ponds, as well as an array of exotic fauna. It’s no wonder that the country attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors a year.

As such, it makes sense that so many people want to take up permanent residence on this idyllic island, which is where our Citizenship by Investment Programme can help. Launched in 1993 — making it one of the world’s longest-running economic citizenship schemes — it allows investors to move, work, and even set up a business in Dominica. And that’s just one of the numerous benefits of the CBI programme and obtaining a Dominica passport. Dominican citizens are also entitled to visa-free access to more than 150 countries around the world, including the entire European Union, the UK and Brazil.

All applicants need to do is decide between two investment options and make the necessary financial contribution. With a minimum investment of $100,000 USD, it is the cheapest citizenship by investment programme in the world. If you’re interested in obtaining Dominican citizenship, you may wish to learn more about our application process or contact us at any time.

Where is Dominica?

Sitting halfway along the Eastern Caribbean archipelago, Dominica is located just a few miles from Martinique to the south and Guadeloupe to the North. Stretching 751 km² (290 square miles), our island boasts 148 km (91 miles) of uninterrupted coastline. Dominica’s official name is the Commonwealth of Dominica, further distinguishing the island from the Dominican Republic, its northerly Caribbean sister.

Population

Dominica has a population of over 71,000, with around 20,000 people inhabiting Roseau, the capital city, and Portsmouth, the second major city. The former is a bustling metropolis brimming with shops, restaurants and bars, with the Old Market one of the Caribbean’s largest outdoor markets. Portsmouth is a lot more laidback, with some of the city’s main draws including diving, boating, and whale-watching.

An inclusive island with a rich cultural makeup, Dominica offers a vibrant mix of European and African influences. Several Dominican tradition derive from Africa, such as the bélé dance. The country also serves as the home to the Caribbean’s only remaining population of pre-Columbian Carib Indians. With Dominica also claimed at various points by the French, the country is massively influenced by Creole culture, with Creole being our native tongue. That said, our official language is English, which is universally spoken and understood. Our most dominant religion is Roman Catholicism, which is practised by over 60% of the population.

The Dominican Culture and Way of Life

Here at the Dominica Citizenship by Investment Unit (CBIU), we want all of our applicants to gain an understanding of what it means to be Dominican, so that they can best adopt the country’s way of life. Key to this is learning about Dominican culture.

Food

Dominica’s cuisine is similar to that of neighbouring Caribbean islands, especially Trinidad and St Lucia. It is rooted in Creole cooking techniques, with tropical ingredients and bold spices prominent, such as parsley, chive, cinnamon, nutmeg, thyme and cloves.

Staple ingredients include vegetables like dasheen, plantain and yams, and fresh greens like lettuce, spinach, and watercress. Seafood is widely eaten here too, with the likes of dorado, kingfish and snapper in high demand. Exotic fruits are also regularly consumed, including avocados, bananas, breadfruits, guavas, coconuts, grapefruits, oranges, tangerines and limes.

Our national dish is callaloo soup, which is made from the green leaves of the dasheen plant, as well as other vegetables and meat. Other staples include the sancocho stew, salted codfish, stews made of manicou or agouti, and mountain chicken, which actually contains frog’s legs.

Drink

You can’t go to Dominica without trying some local rum, with the market split between two producers: Macoucherie and Belfast. Macoucherie’s produce is notable for being made using local cane, giving it a sharp, less sweet and more earthy flavour than typical Caribbean rum. Belfast offers a range of different varieties, with its portfolio including Cask Rum, Red Cap Rum, Soca light Rum, Soca Gold Rum, Soca Overproof Rum, Soca Rum Punch and Bois Bande’ Rum.

The tea culture here in Dominica also has a long history, with its tropical rainforest climate perfect for cultivating many of the plants required to make the drink, such as cocoa, hibiscus and periwinkle. As well as being consumed for enjoyment, tea is often used medicinally, with produce from the common guava leaf used for bowel complaints, and tea from the orange leaf to remedy nausea.

Music

Music is a big part of life on the island, with popular genres including everything from calypso and reggae, to soca and kompa. The lyrics to Dominican music are almost entirely in Creole French, and feature the West African use of call and response singing, clapping as a big part of the rhythm and lyrics, and dance and rhythmic improvisation. Notably, the World Creole Music Festival is held in Dominica each year. Attracting visitors from around the world, the three day festival is a feast for the eyes and the ears.

Dominican folk music is also incredibly popular on the island, and has historically played a huge role in everyday life, including at work and in places of worship. This is noted for featuring bélé and quadrille dances, which are influenced by West African and French Antillean cultures respectively.

Sport

Dominicans live, breathe and sleep cricket. Despite being independent from Britain since 1978, Dominica plays West Indies domestic first-class cricket under the British Windward Islands Cricket Control Board, participating in the Windward Islands team. We also compete in test cricket as part of the West Indies cricket team. On 24 October 2007, the 8,000-seat Windsor cricket stadium was completed, becoming Dominica’s national arena.

As well as cricket, netball, basketball, rugby, tennis and football are widely played here too. Dominica has also sent athletes to the Olympics Games since the 1996 Atlanta Games, though we have still yet to win a medal.

Dominica's Beliefs and Values

The Commonwealth of Dominica is founded upon a belief in fundamental human rights and freedoms. Dignity and equality are paramount, and institutions like the courts and other legal bodies strive to be just and impartial. We also value the role of family in our society, and many of us acknowledge the supremacy of God.

The fundamental human rights and freedoms we believe in are enshrined in our Constitution. Subject to the respect for the rights and freedoms of others and to the public interest, all of our citizens are entitled to the following rights and freedoms, whatever their race, place of origin, political opinion, colour, creed, or gender:

  • Life, liberty, personal security, and the protection of the law;
  • Freedom of conscience, of expression, and of assembly and
    association; and
  • Protection for the privacy of the home and other property, and from deprivation of property without compensation.

Our society is also based on the following shared beliefs and values:

  • Respect for the principles of social justice;
  • Belief that the operation of the economic system should result in the distribution of material resources in such a way as to serve the common good. That there should be adequate means of livelihood for all and that labour should not be exploited or forced by economic necessity. That no one should be compelled to operate in inhumane conditions and that there should be opportunity for advancement based on recognition of merit, ability, and integrity;
  • Belief in a democratic society in which persons may, to the extent of their capacity, play some part in our institutions and in national life, and thus develop and maintain due respect for lawfully-constituted authority; and
  • Recognition that people and institutions remain free only when freedom is founded upon respect for moral and spiritual values and the rule of law.
Economy

Economy

With 4.5 tourists per resident and the tourism industry contributing to almost a quarter of our GDP overall, it’s a fundamental part of life on the island.

Dominica’s natural delights

While most people flock to the Caribbean for its pristine white beaches and year-round sunshine, this isn’t the primary reason tourists come to Dominica.
Rather, it’s the other aspects of the island’s natural beauty that enamour those from outside the country.

As Dominica is home to nine volcanoes and is covered in rainforest, it offers some of the best hiking opportunities in the region. Perhaps the pick of the
bunch is the alluring Boiling Lake trail. This provides stunning views over the island and the opportunity to see indigenous fauna such as the Sisserou parrot, various lizards and even boa constrictors, plus visit the famous Boiling Lake. The 200 x 200 foot flooded fumarole features greyish-blue water and a cloud of vapour that creates a remarkable display. Other natural highlights include Dominica’s waterfalls and its magnificent coral reefs, which are home to sea creatures including dolphins, octopuses and seahorses.

Dominica ecotourism

Dominica’s ecotourism industry is also a major draw. With the country moving towards complete climate resilience in recent years, visitors can come to Dominica safe in the knowledge that their trip helps to preserve and boost the local environment. For instance, the country actively promotes ecotourism trips that allow tourists to visit Dominica without causing any harm. These include walking tours and water activities where the safety of the sea creatures is paramount.

Not only this, but there’s an abundance of eco friendly accommodation for visitors to stay in, many of which are actually funded by the CBI programme.
Take the Secret Bay hotel, for example, which consists of villas made of sustainably sourced tropical hardwood and boasts a Zero Waste policy. While Jungle Bay Resort also utilises local materials and serves food from nearby organic farmers and small scale fisheries.

land-and-climate

Land and Climate

With 4.5 tourists per resident and the tourism industry contributing to almost a quarter of our GDP overall, it’s a fundamental part of life on the island.

Dominica’s natural delights

While most people flock to the Caribbean for its pristine white beaches and year-round sunshine, this isn’t the primary reason tourists come to Dominica.
Rather, it’s the other aspects of the island’s natural beauty that enamour those from outside the country.

As Dominica is home to nine volcanoes and is covered in rainforest, it offers some of the best hiking opportunities in the region. Perhaps the pick of the
bunch is the alluring Boiling Lake trail. This provides stunning views over the island and the opportunity to see indigenous fauna such as the Sisserou parrot, various lizards and even boa constrictors, plus visit the famous Boiling Lake. The 200 x 200 foot flooded fumarole features greyish-blue water and a cloud of vapour that creates a remarkable display. Other natural highlights include Dominica’s waterfalls and its magnificent coral reefs, which are home to sea creatures including dolphins, octopuses and seahorses.

Dominica ecotourism

Dominica’s ecotourism industry is also a major draw. With the country moving towards complete climate resilience in recent years, visitors can come to Dominica safe in the knowledge that their trip helps to preserve and boost the local environment. For instance, the country actively promotes ecotourism trips that allow tourists to visit Dominica without causing any harm. These include walking tours and water activities where the safety of the sea creatures is paramount.

Not only this, but there’s an abundance of eco friendly accommodation for visitors to stay in, many of which are actually funded by the CBI programme.
Take the Secret Bay hotel, for example, which consists of villas made of sustainably sourced tropical hardwood and boasts a Zero Waste policy. While Jungle Bay Resort also utilises local materials and serves food from nearby organic farmers and small scale fisheries.

air-travel

Travel by air

With 4.5 tourists per resident and the tourism industry contributing to almost a quarter of our GDP overall, it’s a fundamental part of life on the island.

Dominica’s natural delights

While most people flock to the Caribbean for its pristine white beaches and year-round sunshine, this isn’t the primary reason tourists come to Dominica.
Rather, it’s the other aspects of the island’s natural beauty that enamour those from outside the country.

As Dominica is home to nine volcanoes and is covered in rainforest, it offers some of the best hiking opportunities in the region. Perhaps the pick of the
bunch is the alluring Boiling Lake trail. This provides stunning views over the island and the opportunity to see indigenous fauna such as the Sisserou parrot, various lizards and even boa constrictors, plus visit the famous Boiling Lake. The 200 x 200 foot flooded fumarole features greyish-blue water and a cloud of vapour that creates a remarkable display. Other natural highlights include Dominica’s waterfalls and its magnificent coral reefs, which are home to sea creatures including dolphins, octopuses and seahorses.

Dominica ecotourism

Dominica’s ecotourism industry is also a major draw. With the country moving towards complete climate resilience in recent years, visitors can come to Dominica safe in the knowledge that their trip helps to preserve and boost the local environment. For instance, the country actively promotes ecotourism trips that allow tourists to visit Dominica without causing any harm. These include walking tours and water activities where the safety of the sea creatures is paramount.

Not only this, but there’s an abundance of eco friendly accommodation for visitors to stay in, many of which are actually funded by the CBI programme.
Take the Secret Bay hotel, for example, which consists of villas made of sustainably sourced tropical hardwood and boasts a Zero Waste policy. While Jungle Bay Resort also utilises local materials and serves food from nearby organic farmers and small scale fisheries.

Tourism

Tourism

With 4.5 tourists per resident and the tourism industry contributing to almost a quarter of our GDP overall, it’s a fundamental part of life on the island.

Dominica’s natural delights

While most people flock to the Caribbean for its pristine white beaches and year-round sunshine, this isn’t the primary reason tourists come to Dominica.
Rather, it’s the other aspects of the island’s natural beauty that enamour those from outside the country.

As Dominica is home to nine volcanoes and is covered in rainforest, it offers some of the best hiking opportunities in the region. Perhaps the pick of the
bunch is the alluring Boiling Lake trail. This provides stunning views over the island and the opportunity to see indigenous fauna such as the Sisserou parrot, various lizards and even boa constrictors, plus visit the famous Boiling Lake. The 200 x 200 foot flooded fumarole features greyish-blue water and a cloud of vapour that creates a remarkable display. Other natural highlights include Dominica’s waterfalls and its magnificent coral reefs, which are home to sea creatures including dolphins, octopuses and seahorses.

Dominica ecotourism

Dominica’s ecotourism industry is also a major draw. With the country moving towards complete climate resilience in recent years, visitors can come to Dominica safe in the knowledge that their trip helps to preserve and boost the local environment. For instance, the country actively promotes ecotourism trips that allow tourists to visit Dominica without causing any harm. These include walking tours and water activities where the safety of the sea creatures is paramount.

Not only this, but there’s an abundance of eco friendly accommodation for visitors to stay in, many of which are actually funded by the CBI programme.
Take the Secret Bay hotel, for example, which consists of villas made of sustainably sourced tropical hardwood and boasts a Zero Waste policy. While Jungle Bay Resort also utilises local materials and serves food from nearby organic farmers and small scale fisheries.

Business

Business opportunities

With 4.5 tourists per resident and the tourism industry contributing to almost a quarter of our GDP overall, it’s a fundamental part of life on the island.

Dominica’s natural delights

While most people flock to the Caribbean for its pristine white beaches and year-round sunshine, this isn’t the primary reason tourists come to Dominica.
Rather, it’s the other aspects of the island’s natural beauty that enamour those from outside the country.

As Dominica is home to nine volcanoes and is covered in rainforest, it offers some of the best hiking opportunities in the region. Perhaps the pick of the
bunch is the alluring Boiling Lake trail. This provides stunning views over the island and the opportunity to see indigenous fauna such as the Sisserou parrot, various lizards and even boa constrictors, plus visit the famous Boiling Lake. The 200 x 200 foot flooded fumarole features greyish-blue water and a cloud of vapour that creates a remarkable display. Other natural highlights include Dominica’s waterfalls and its magnificent coral reefs, which are home to sea creatures including dolphins, octopuses and seahorses.

Dominica ecotourism

Dominica’s ecotourism industry is also a major draw. With the country moving towards complete climate resilience in recent years, visitors can come to Dominica safe in the knowledge that their trip helps to preserve and boost the local environment. For instance, the country actively promotes ecotourism trips that allow tourists to visit Dominica without causing any harm. These include walking tours and water activities where the safety of the sea creatures is paramount.

Not only this, but there’s an abundance of eco friendly accommodation for visitors to stay in, many of which are actually funded by the CBI programme.
Take the Secret Bay hotel, for example, which consists of villas made of sustainably sourced tropical hardwood and boasts a Zero Waste policy. While Jungle Bay Resort also utilises local materials and serves food from nearby organic farmers and small scale fisheries.

International memberships

Dominica is a member of several international organisations, including:

CARICOM

CARICOM (Caribbean Community) is an international organisation consisting of 15 Caribbean member-states. The organisation works to promote economic cooperation and integration in the region, and its secretariat headquarters are based in Georgetown, Guyana.

The Commonwealth of Nations

The Commonwealth of Nations is a voluntary organisation of 53 countries. While they share no legal commitment to each other, they have a common goal of enhancing the “development of free and democratic societies” and “promoting peace and prosperity to improve the lives of all peoples of the Commonwealth”.

There are many benefits to being a Commonwealth member. These include easier travel between member states, protection by other embassies and commissions, and eligibility for certain cultural or sporting activities, including the Commonwealth Games. For more information, please visit the Commonwealth’s official website.

Other international memberships

Dominica is also a member of:

  • The Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS)
  • The Caribbean Development Bank (CDB)
  • The United Nations (UN)
  • The International Monetary Fund (IMF)
  • The World Bank
  • The Organisation of American States (OAS)

We maintain missions in Washington D.C., New York, London, and Brussels, and we are represented jointly with other OECS members in Canada.

COVID-19

Dominica has been roundly praised for its handling of the coronavirus pandemic. At the time of writing, there have been fewer than 500 cases in total and under 30 deaths from COVID-19 since the island’s first case in March 2020. Almost a third of the population have been doubly vaccinated, and Dominica appears to have suffered very few economic effects from the pandemic.

This is epitomised by the government pushing forward with plans to build Dominica’s first long-haul airport. Most fully vaccinated nationals can now enter the country without having to quarantine, provided they show a negative coronavirus test result.